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Tuesday, March 29, 2005

Hitting the fan

Well it seems that the word is out as to what happened at the calendar committee last Thursday (one of my bills was for all intents and purposes killed by the speaker and friends for what was quoted on this blog) but thanks to some of my fellow bloggers in the room and a few critical interns for said speaker confirming the story by trying to rub it in (oops!!) the Tennessean is doing a AP story about this blog site and the stir it has caused. I guess bloggers really do hear it first. Hopefully this will open some eyes of voters to problems legislators face as well as the power of this new media to some legislators.

35 comments:

  1. All elected officials should be required by law to file a daily report on their blogs for the people.

    Thanks for the good blogging leadership. Someday the others will get a clue.

    Someday somebody in Georgia may even get a clue and then I can leave you alone and go bother them.

    Doug Kenline
    Atlanta, Georgia
    http://dougkenline.blogspot.com/

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  2. Keep going! This is great!

    Don't let the blue hairs get you down.

    Ryan James
    McAllen, Texas
    http://ryanjamestv/blogspot.com

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  3. It occurs to me that folks might not get why xbrl is so important to disclosure. Simply put, extensible business reporting tool is an xml based way of reporting budgets (among other things), to the line item if desired. It's gaining global adoption but adoption lags here in the US -- I don't know why -- does anyone working on Wall Street have any suggestions? Oh and Bill -- since it's an xml based technology it can be programmatically produced and posted to a blog (say by a politician) near real-time.

    Now there are pdf-to-xml conversion houses out there so if politicians want to publish full budgets in pdf that can be dealt with, too.

    But if transparency is the goal -- as opposed to rhetorizing about transparency -- I saw vote for xbrl!

    Here's a faq for folks who want to learn more http://xbrl.edgar-online.com/x/faqs/

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  4. It occurs to me that folks might not get why xbrl is so important to disclosure. Simply put, extensible business reporting tool is an xml based way of reporting budgets (among other things), to the line item if desired. It's gaining global adoption but adoption lags here in the US -- I don't know why -- does anyone working on Wall Street have any suggestions? Oh and Bill -- since it's an xml based technology it can be programmatically produced and posted to a blog (say by a politician) near real-time.

    Now there are pdf-to-xml conversion houses out there so if politicians want to publish full budgets in pdf that can be dealt with, too.

    But if transparency is the goal -- as opposed to rhetorizing about transparency -- I saw vote for xbrl!

    Here's a faq for folks who want to learn more http://xbrl.edgar-online.com/x/faqs/

    I think the NGA.org ought to create comparative state budgets for all 50 states so we can determine the efficiency and effecacy of each program.

    Ed Dodds
    www.conmergence.com

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  5. nice blog! interesting.. keep it up.


    Tesya
    insanetesya.blogspot.com

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  6. You are making the faulty assumption that all members of the Tennessee General Assembly (or other elective offices across the state of Tennessee) can actually string together enough words to form a single coherent paragraph, let alone a daily report that has not been boilerplated by a party head.

    http://impeachmatthewhill.blogspot.com/

    Try this blog --- impeach Rep. Matthew Hill (R-7H, Jonesborough)

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  7. Thank you for what you have begun. The people of Tennessee deserve honesty in their government. Truth should not be an option for elected officials. Spin and agendas corrupt the intent of representative government. The folks deserve no less than to know how their representatives behave and their relationships to other members.

    The issues are important, but so are the tactics used to prevent or enable legislatiion. Maybe if more representives were accountable daily by reporting their efforts and blogged their constituents, the legislature could become a credible place - even representing the folks.

    We all should be tired of allegatioins of ethical violations and the lack of accountable elected officals to do whatever they want instead of honestly serving the people for whom they work.

    Your efforts help clean the air and may clean out some lawmakers.

    Congratulations on your efforts to make the Tennessee legislature transparent.

    William Freeman

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  8. Good work! As a former intern myself, its nice to see someone as yourself post about all of the trash that occurs at our illustrious statehouse. The behavior of some of our elected officials has been and still is disgusting. Keep up the good work and dont let the criminals get you down!

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  9. To be called "scandalous and scurrilous" by Jere Hargrove means that you must be doing something right! I commend you for your courage and honesty.

    I just wish I could be a fly on the wall in LP to watch the ridiculous behavior of those members that are so shocked and appalled that a freshman Republican would dare open his mouth.

    Keep up the good work! And come visit West TN sometime!!

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  10. Keep it up!

    Roaches run for cover when you throw the light switch.

    It'sold time politics. Naifeh & company prefer to keep the citizens of this state in the dark(ages) by using backroom good ol' boy deal cutting, threats and and tactics like last minute vote calls to avoid raising public backlash.

    That's how you get bad law that no one bothered to read.

    Why not take some of the cable TV taxes the state collects and broadcast legislative proceedings on local cable channels similar to CSPAN?

    The coverage of Nashville politics in Knoxville is next to none. If it were not for blogs like Bill Hobbs they would pretty much run over us all of the time.

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  11. Rep. Campfield, thank you for doing this blog! I actually was an intern in Nashville for Rep. Dunn and Sen. McNally back in 2003. I also ran against Rep. Bunch in the Republican Primary last August. I had every intention, had I won, to do a blog. I came across this via the Tennessean's article. As I was always told, if they're shooting at you, ya must be doing something right! Keep up the good work!

    Andrew Morgan
    http://www.votemorgan.us
    http://www.hometowncleveland.com

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  12. Hello. I'm not a politician. I'm a graduated student at MTSU who happened to read about this blog in our student newspaper. I just want to applaud you for starting this blog. As a blogger, I know that blogs are supposed to supply you a place to vent frustrations and to speak your own opinions. Your critics do not understand that. So, thank you and keep up the good work. I'll keep an eye on what you're saying.

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  13. I'm not here to say that what you're doing is unethical or wrong, but I will say that you're pretty much throwing bi-partisanship out the door.
    Also, I know you're in a hurry to type these updates out, but you're a state legislator and you can't spell worth a lick. You should make a habit of spell checking your work before you post it for God and everyone to see!

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  14. Wow, please keep up the good work! When I read the assorted comments about your not being grateful for the position you've been "given", they kept running through my head in Foghorn Leghorn's voice; I could just hear the elder statesmen of the House verbalizing their disapproval of young upstarts like you in their privileged good-old-boy voices. The whining of those folks complaining that you don't dress well enough to be a legislator just cracks me up -- ol' John Ford is quite the dandy, but of course he can afford to be since he's been robbing the state blind for years! As long as you're clean and honest, ratty tennies and a t-shirt are fine by me...please don't sell out like so many of your elders in state government.

    With that aside, I'd love to proofread and edit your posts before they go up on the blog -- I promise I won't change the meaning, but you really do need a little help on that issue to be as effective as you can be. It's a shame that people are wasting time harassing you about that kind of thing instead of focusing on what you're trying to accomplish, which is what's really important. Contact me and I'll do it, no charge!

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  15. Thank you for what you are doing. I don't live in Tennessee, and will probably never have the opportunity to vote for you, but if the time comes, I will do what I can to support you. Transperancy in government is a must, and you are helping in the efforts.

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  16. Hang in there and don't let them get you down. You sound like a welcome breath of fresh air.

    Maybe you guys can pass a bill the makes it mandatory for each member of the legislature to maintain a blog informing their constituents daily of what they did and why.

    Most of us voters are sick of politicians mealy mouthing all the time. Keep speaking out openly, truthfully, and clearly about the shenanigans engaged in by your colleagues. In other words, open the drapes and let the sun shine in every corner.

    Your constituents will respect you for it. And never forget, your moral duty is to your constituents, not your legislative colleagues.

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  17. Keep up the good work. I wish my representatives had blogs.

    Hopefully this will work well for you and your constituents.

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  18. Just a a quick grammatical comment: the expression is for all intents and purposes, not all intense and purposes. When I was younger, I thought it was all intensive purposes, which really doesn't make sense, but what did I know?

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  19. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  20. I really dont know if its smart to have such a blog that insults the people you have to work with every day. Keep the blog dont get me wrong.....but watch what you say and dont burn your bridges. You have democratic constituents too so just watch yourself.

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  21. How ironic that there has been displeasure regarding your shedding light on the issues listed.

    Roaches also scurry when the light reaches their haunts.

    Keep up the good work!

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  22. Representative Campfield,

    Bravo for making a blog! I, too, am a freshman at the General Assembly though I am not an elected official. I am merely one who comes down twice a week and sits-in on committee meetings. I, too, generally wear my sneakers as opposed to dress shoes and to take it further, I prefer wearing my leather jacket (which I love) instead of my blazer. Though I am not a constituent nor am I even a Republican, I really think it's awesome that you're making a blog to let people know an insider's story--because the local news media certainly won't. Please keep it up and encourage other legislators!

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  23. Up until now, if you were an encumbent in Tennessee you didn't get my vote. You've changed my mind. If you'll stick to your guns, then by God, I'm with you.

    Thanks for your honesty and keep it up.

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  24. Great job, Sir.
    I bookmarked the site as soon as I could. I hope the article in the Tennessean gets you and the blog some recognition I think most of the members of the General Assembly think "blog" is a dirty word. The more I learn about what goes on at the Capitol, the more I am scared.

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  25. Keep up the good work. I'm an elected blogger myself: an elected prosecutor in Virginia. I blog over at http://www.vaconservative.com

    I firmly believe that we need more elected bloggers.

    JB

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  26. Hang in there, buddy. I'm blogging from the Utah Legislature (www.steveu.com) -- and constituents love it. It is a great way to involve people in their government.

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  27. to boro thanks for your offer two months ago i could hardly spell blog or type it some say i still cant and your foghorn leghorn statement had me and some of my fellow legislators rolling.

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  28. to boro thanks for your offer two months ago i could hardly spell blog or type it some say i still cant and your foghorn leghorn statement had me and some of my fellow legislators rolling.

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  29. to drksnake introduce your self to me next time your in the house

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  30. to all, thanks for your support .boy this got big fast and i owe it to my fellow blogers who incouraged me and helped spread the site. keep it up others are starting to notice...

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  31. I agree that blogging is a great way to keep in touch with consituients and to avoid the filter of the press/media. I applaud Rep. Campfield for doing this, and I hope more of our elected officials start communicating with the people in this fashion. However, I must point out that the Tennessean story Rep. Campfield mentions fails to note a few tidbits of information:
    1) The legislation that was the "victim" of the calendar committee makes it a crime to point laser pointers at police officers. Interesting, since there have been no reports of this actually occuring in TN, and there are already laws on the books (onstruction of an officer in the performance of his duty, etc.) that would cover this situation. One wonders what brought on the need to sponsor this bill when so many needs in TN go unaddressed.
    2) Rep. Campfield currently owes back property taxes on 6 properties in Knox County. A self-proclaimed fiscal conservative who advocates financial planning in govt and a smaller govt overall does not know if he owees back taxes or how much he owes (despite a link provided in the "Again?!?!" thread) and places the onus of responsibility on the govt to collect those taxes. Come on, pay your taxes! Leadership by example is often better than leadership by useless legislation.
    3) Rep Campfield has previoulsy been arrested -a minor infraction to be sure, but it should be noted in the record.
    4) Freshman legislators in the minority party do not usually have much clout to push bills through committee. Whether this is good or bad, it should be noted.
    5) I really think everyone should notice that many of the bloggers on this site are not from TN.
    That's all for now

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  32. sorry never been under arrest,conservatives dont like to give money to the goverment,you have no blog site to speak of as is with most of my critics, at least they are real people not someone with a agenda,many of the people who voted against my bill after my blog came out were the same ones who voted for and praised it earlier,and if a freshman has a good bill killed because he is a frosh you might want to ask if the people killing it are doing the work of the state or protecting their own position.boy ,I must have hit a nerve for you to go to all this trouble over me.

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  33. On the concept of Televized Tennessee folks should be aware of this event to underwrite such an endeavor:

    http://www.thepublicforum.org/tbrt/brickfest.html#

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