Sunday, February 26, 2012

It's a sexy bill

Yes, Rep. Joe Carr and I are going to try to pass the the "Porn not corn" tax swap bill this year. What the bill does is increase the tax on hard core pornography, escort services, strip clubs and other such products and the resulting income will be dedicated to lowering the tax on groceries. It is not a true tax increase in that it is revenue neutral for the state.

The fiscal study says the tax swap will generate $55,000,000.00 in Tennessee in the first year alone (and it looks pretty stable after that) and the income generated would be dedicated to lowering the tax on food by up to triple (or even possibly more) the amount the governor has proposed in the next year.

This will put one simple question out there to legislators. Why would you vote for cheap porn, escorts and strippers and against lowering the tax on food?

7 comments:

  1. I do have a question about this. One, I thought escort services were illegal in the state of Tennessee. Secondly. I'm doubting the 55,000,0000 dollar figure. So is the reduction in the tax on food tied to the actual dollar amount raised by the tax swap?

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  2. How about just cutting the tax on food and leaving the other stuff alone? I've got a weakness for lapdances.

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  3. Why is stripping legal, but not prostitution?

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  4. Stacey 'Big Government' Campfield, please LESS taxes.
    Lower Taxes Through Less Government. More Taxes = More Government.

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  5. I agree with the second poster. Cut the tax on food and leave everything else alone. I'm skeptical of the $55,000,000 dollar claim as well. I bet it assumes that the added porn tax will have no effect on purchases. Generally, when you tax something you get less of it. I would wager that the tax on porn would eventually cause reveune to go down because it will be purchased less. This is the whole "tax cuts must be paid for" argument. How about cutting spending instead of increasing taxes?

    I am so sick of politicians using the tax code to punish legal industries they don't like. Let the people decide for themselves which businesses they patronize and stop punishing them for doing so. Also, does Carr really think that this tax will help save marriages?

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  6. Has Mr. Campfield considered that adult businesses don't have a captive audience? If they're not competitive, their customers will go elsewhere and, not only will he not raise the $55 mil in taxes he projects, he will lose millions in taxes that are currently collected when the businesses go out of business. In addition, the taxpayers will have to support unemployed, unskilled workers from the businesses that are forced onto public assistance.

    I would propose instead of this porn tax a ten-foot distance requirement that keeps ignorant, ambitious lawmakers ten feet away from anything that takes jobs away from people, taxes away from the state coffers and allows the moral arbiters to try to smother businesses they don't like and to deprive people of their free choice as to where they want to work and play,

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  7. Don't give up! Just like alcohol, and tobacco, porn should be taxed. I'm for a nation wide tax on porn and all adult related product proceeds.

    Keep up the good work!

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