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Saturday, January 05, 2013

Sometimes I hate being so right.

As predicted. The lobbyists are starting to come in and push the freshman hard to carry their legislation. Legislation they're not prepared for yet. Legislation for smaller groups is being pushed aside. Soon the smaller groups will be forced to hire lobbyists to push the bills they need passed. This could end as a huge mess.

15 comments:

  1. Stacey,

    So what you’re saying is that lobbyists are pushing for laws and policies, which may override the will of “smaller groups” who do not have the power to have their voices heard.

    That’s kind of what I’ve been talking about to you. You claim that a small group (i.e. the LGBT community) can’t get their voices heard because we represent such a small number of the population. And you’re saying that the only way we can get the attention of legislators is to hire lobbyists.

    You, on the one hand, seem to think that’s a bad thing. But for our particular group, you seem to think that’s a good thing—since our small group doesn’t have the voting power to make any real change in our favor.

    Here’s what I think… We already have lobbyists in Washington and in many states throughout the country. And as for your comments in other posts on your blog that the LGBT community only makes up a small percentage of the population; our community has grown to include not only the LGBT community, but also ALLIES. So, the LGBT and Allies community makes up around 50% or more—that’s what the stats show. As those numbers continue to grow, we will have our voices heard and laws will be changed.

    It’s already happening all over the country.

    Tom

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    1. Tom, I think all groups have the right to be heard, I just do not think all ideas of those groups have to be acted upon. That is up to the will of the legislature and I do not support stopping or limiting the legislatures ability to pass laws as it sees fit (except by the constitution). That is where we are.

      Tom, it seems you have put all your valuation of yourself on your sexuality. I think you and all people are better then that.

      I honestly don't really care what you do in your bedroom. While i think it is deadly and sinful I do think it is your business and your choice what you do behind closed doors. I hope you make better choices but that is not for me to decide.

      of course I can decide what behaviors get rewarded and what behaviors do not based on their benefit to society. On that issue as the elected representative I have the ability and duty to decide what should be rewarded for its benefit to society and the greater good. I do not think you have proven to me that your lifestyle is natural and truly beyond your control, that it is healthy or that it is something that should be rewarded for its benefit or potential benefit to society. Until you do, I think we are just going to have to agree to disagree on what bills should be passed as I see you as just working to serve your own personal wants and not those that will be of benefit to the greater good (my goal).

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    2. Stacey,

      So you are firmly on record as saying that it is YOUR will and views, not the will and views of the people, on which you base your actions in office?

      And you don’t see a problem with that?

      You get to single-handedly decide what is best for us; as though we are children; as though we are incapable of knowing what is best for us as free, tax-paying, law-abiding citizens of this state and country?

      I think the old saying, “I’d hate to have your nerve in my tooth”, would sum up the beliefs of your constituency.

      Tom

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    3. Well, yes. That's what a republic is.... You vote for the candidate that most represents your views.
      Jonathan

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  2. You are failing to see the good this can do. This limit may force legislators to choose to either tend to their constituents or show that they are bought and paid for.

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    1. Tona,

      I don’t think you understand what Stacey is saying. He is saying that he, alone as legislator, gets to decide what is “good” or “bad” for this state. It’s as though he doesn’t care what his constituents want or believe; it’s only his opinion that matters.

      And I’m saying that the founding fathers did not intend for tyrannical or dictator-like leadership when creating this country. We had that in England prior to the Revolutionary War.

      Stacey represents a more left-leaning area of Tennessee. Yet he goes out on his own and determines what he believes is right or wrong for the people he represents; based on his (not our) values and belief systems.

      It’s outrageous!

      Tom

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    2. Tom, I fully get what Stacey is saying. The Republican controlled legislature went hog wild last year, introducing 3800+ bills. So much for limited government.

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  3. Tom you want to have it both ways. You wish to blame legislators for all the legislation you don't agree with yet at the same time you say legislators are not the ones that make the laws. Either legislators make the laws or we do not. Legislators are privy to much more information and study facts and issues much more than the general public does. I vote as I think my constituents would vote where they to study the issue as I have studied the issue and were they To have all the same information that I have. That is how a representative republic works. As for your other comments on other posts you may wish to reread my rules for comment previous to posting again. I reposted them just for you because some of your comments were a little out there.

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    1. If the legislators make the laws, then why have an exception for the Governor's agenda?

      "I vote as I think my constituents would vote where they to study the issue as I have studied the issue and were they To have all the same information that I have."

      This isn't to pick on you personally Stacey, but I rarely, if ever, met a legislator who votes like that.

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    2. Stacey,

      You are the one who said “we get to make the laws”, referring to legislators. I was simply responding to that comment—saying that it’s not what the founding fathers intended.

      We are a free country, populated by free individuals. We vote on local laws and ordinances. And we certainly vote on our legislators based on their actions—whether we believe they represent our community’s ideas or not. And finally, our Constitution—the U.S. Constitution—and Supreme Court findings in most cases override state constitutions.

      I can’t imagine why you’d say that you are privy to information that most citizens do not have. With the Internet, we have access to just about everything out there. If it’s been written or typed on a computer, then it’s likely available for search and review to anyone interested.

      That’s why, when you say something locally, it can get broadcasted around the country in seconds.

      I’m not sure which comments you believe I have made are “out there”. But, hey, this is your playground. It’s your blog. It’s your website. And if you wish to not publish what I have said here, that’s fine.

      Let me know where I have been out of line and I will work to remain within your guidelines.

      Tom

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    3. Tom. You do not vote on state laws. Get it through your head. You vote on legislators who vote on state laws. At best you may get to vote on some local ordinances or constitutional amendments after they have passed the state legislature bu 2/3 but that's about it. As for your comments just read the rules again and review your own comments .

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  4. Tom where the shoe on the other foot you would do the exact same thing you would be voting your opinion. If the people of your district came to you and by 80 or 90% said homosexual marriage should not be allowed in Tennessee would you vote that way? No you would vote on your opinion that homosexuality should be glorified by the state.

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    1. Stacey,

      But that’s how you say you vote—not based on what is “popular”, but based on what YOU, personally, believe is best for the district. You just said in an earlier post that you have access to—were privy to— information that most voters are not.

      Do you have actual numbers—scientifically gathered data—that supports your claim that 80% to 90% do not support same-sex marriage? Because, I’ve checked… And there haven’t been any recent reports published locally that supports that claim.

      If you have those kinds of numbers that would be helpful wouldn’t it?

      Madeline Rogero and the Knoxville City Council voted to end discrimination in Knoxville government based on LGBT orientation. She said, “In my campaign and at my inauguration, I said my administration welcomed and represented all of Knoxville. By strengthening the City's own nondiscrimination policies, we will help ensure that City government is a place where everyone is valued and respected."

      Maybe she and the Council have access to figures and information that you don’t.

      Look, just before desegregation took place in the South, the popularity of integration was near zero. Thankfully, the federal government, the Supreme Court, and, eventually, the population, saw the error of their ways.

      The same is happening for equal rights regarding LGBT issues. It’s inevitable.

      Tom

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    2. Yeah, that's not how government is supposed to work. You're supposed to vote for the people of your district regardless of your personal beliefs.

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  5. Either it or we will go the same way every other society. Who has supported homosexuality has. To the dustbin of bad ideas.

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